Military Gear & Army Surplus Gear Blog

Homework Hotline: P.W. Minor

Homework Hotline: P.W. Minor


(Narrator) Have you ever looked down at your shoes and
wondered how they are made? P.W. Minor in Batavia, New York has been on the
forefront of creating shoes since 1867. Their merchandise ranges from high end boots—-to
military boots—-to orthopedic shoes. The styles of the shoes have changed over
the years, but the process of how they are made, has not. (Nicole Porter) “P.W. Minor has been in business for 150 years but
the process hasn’t really changed from back when these shoes were first produced
to how they’re being produced now. The equipment has definitely upgraded and
we’ve got a lot new equipment in the factory to make it more efficient but it’s still
going through the same manual hands on process that it was 150 years ago” (Narrator) The first step in the shoe making process
is to take the measurements of the leather so that as much of the materials is used as
possible. The leather is also inspected and circles
are drawn around the blemishes and impurities so that those spots will be avoided once the
leather is cut. The leather is then sent to the cutting station. A bar code is scanned allowing the workers
to see where the leather should be cut. The machines then cut the pieces needed and
workers on the other side take those pieces and sort them for production. The leather will then go through a fitting
process. It will be cut again to make sure that it
is the correct size and thickness for the shoe and then these pieces are stitched together. After these pieces are done going through
“fitting” the shoe starts to take shape. (Nicole) “So once the shoes are finished
over in fitting it’s going to look similar to this, like a little hat, and then they’re
going to come over and they’re going to get what’s called the last. All these bins back here are last. A last is just this mold that goes inside
the shape of the shoe so that when it comes out of production, it looks like your foot. (Narrator) The extra material is then trimmed and plastic wrap is added to it so that the upper materials on the shoes are protected
throughout the rest of the process. The bottom of the shoe is then evened out
so that the sole can be attached properly. A “shank” is also added to help with the
support. The bottom of the shoe is then filled in with
cork that will shape to the foot a few times after it is warn and helps create a more comfortable
shoe. After the cork, the sole of the shoe is glued
in to place and is then stitched around the welt. The heel of the shoe is then added on. Nails are used to hold the heel in place. The shoe is then cleaned up and sent over
to another station for shoe laces to be added. The shoe is then packaged and shipped out
the door for consumers to purchase. (Music)


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